This Celeb-Loved Label Has The Strangest Anti-Feminist Descriptions For Its Designs

Réalisation Par
(Réalisation Par)

You can spot Alexa Chung’s signature style a mile off – vintage flippy sundress, chunky brogues, the standard Chanel handbag (of course), so it’s no surprise that she’s given Australian label Réalisation Par her stamp of approval, along with fellow bright young things Kylie Jenner, Kaia Gerber and Bella Hadid.

🌟Dreamgirl @bellahadid wearing her Alexandra Navy star, with Dreamgirls @camimorrone and @ibellapeschardt 🌟💫

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But beneath the surface of this effervescent Aussie brand lies something quite… strange. Take, for example, the description of its frilled-edge dress The Alexandra:

“Here’s what we know. Men love sundresses. We also know this point is actually pointless because we women dress for ourselves and ourselves only. But sometimes… just sometimes you need a get-out-of-jail-free card. Maybe you forgot to take the trash out or you scratched your dad’s car or maybe you were really late and you forgot do the one thing they asked you to do. Whatever the reason, the Alexandra dress is the solution.”

I mean, there’s more, but need we go on? The same misogynistic undertones come through in the description of The 1996 midi slip dress, perfect for “any wedding, party, black tie, cocktail event or place where you’ll be a plus one.”

Because, of course, you’re destined to be someone’s arm candy rather than the main invitee.

Then there’s the Christy mini, that “says everything it needs to say, without saying anything at all because the only thing they’re going to remember is how good YOU look in it.”

It’s evident that the thread running through the brand’s clumsy copy is quite anti-feminist, channelling the utmost importance towards looking good in the eyes of men, standing by his side as an escort for the evening, or naughtily causing damage to your dad’s shiny new car (no, we don’t get it either. But hey, what about your mum’s car?). All of which, comes at a price of around £125 a piece.

Unfortunately, they’re not the only label to come under fire for treating women like objects recently – retailer Missguided faced backlash over a sign reading ‘Send Me Nudes’ in one of its stores, seemingly encouraging young females to reveal themselves in the name of sexting.

We thought this culture had ended with the end of American Apparel in 2016, but alas, in 2017 some labels are no more woke.

Réalisation Par has been reach out to for comment.